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20121101
20121130
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CSPAN2 15
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English 15
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15
CSPAN
Nov 5, 2012 7:00am EST
, present-day india, the ching dynasty, temporary china, and the tokugawa shogunate in japan. each of these fears had its own way of governing on its own cultural and political approach to commerce, and order. if you fast-forward about 100, 120 years to the 19th century, the world changed dramatically. power had shifted from the west and the south to the north. and by 1815, the end of the napoleonic wars, europe had pulled ahead of the rest of the world. and the industrial revolution and the development of the steam engine and the development of steel and battleships, and the telegraph and underground, the underwater submarine cable enabled europe, not just to be the most powerful place in the world, but to extend its reach globally. and by the end of the 19th century, europe had either colonized or had already de- colonized 90% of the world landmass. and we have been living in the world since 1815 dominated by the west. economically, politically and ideologically. first it was europe, then europe handed over the baton to the united states after pearl harbor, and roughly 1815 until
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2012 9:45pm EST
called oval challenges. so just one is a gentleman who is an optometrist in southern india and in the late 1970s he retired and ss retirement project he was about 57 and wanted to descend before his community. and so he decided he was going to try to address the problem of needless blindness due to cataracts. in the united states as an outpatient operation. you don't have people blind due to cataracts. and the rest of the world there's a hundred million people blind due to cataracts. so this is not a was no wanted to address. so we started the clinic in his home in yet another benson family members hope to make up this thing off the ground. forward not just one or two or three great ideas, but hundreds of innovations. tenacity of an entire community, global team of people, one of the folks who contributed to the eradication of smallpox. david greene. all these people built together to build the hospital and to this day, the hospital has secured 3 million people of blindness. i do imagine the entire washington metro area of about 3 million people. imagine all those people bl
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2012 8:00pm EST
and look at the issues that have to do with pakistan's relationship to india the issues that have to do with the sequence of events that will take place after 2014 when the american focus once again as steve mentioned, when the american focus become somewhat less on our relationship to counterterrorism and opens the door for more creative ways of business, academic, media and other links with pakistan that has suffered in last 10 years because of our focus. i guess i come out out of your question answering that i'm cautiously optimistic that there were two things on the rails which if you know what happened over the last two years is not an easy thing. it was kind of like rolling down the side of the -- with rocks and cactus is is an you don't know how far the ripping go so when i see these keeping things on track it's not easy to keep things on track and pakistan is the way it is mismanaged and the difficulties in our relationship but if we are able to do so after 2014 there will be a prospect that we can open up to new kinds of cooperation if we are not slaves to a bilateral vision ba
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2012 11:00pm EST
's relationship to india, the sequence of events that take place after 2014 when the americans focus, again, as steve mentioned, when the american focus becomes somewhat less on the relationship through counterterrorism and opens the door for more creative ways of business, academic, media, other links with pakistan that really suffered in the last ten years because of the focus on ct. i guess i come out to the question answering that i'm cautiously optimistic if we keep it on the rails, which if you know what happened over two years, it's not an easy thing, but like rolling down the side of a are vein, and you don't know how far the ravine goes. when i say "keeping things on track," it's not easy to keep things on track in pakistan because of the way it's mismanaged, because of the difficulties in the relationship, but if we are able to do so, i think after 2014, there will be a prospect to open up to new kinds of cooperation if we are not slaves to a bilateral vision that's based on this trust, but if we focus on the multilateral and regional issues leading to economic growth, relations w
CSPAN
Nov 12, 2012 8:30am EST
's relations with india, the issues that have to do with the sequence of events that will take place after 2014 when the american focus once again as steve mentioned, when the american focus becomes somewhat less a relationship through counterterrorism and opens the door for more creative ways of business, academic, media, other links with pakistan that have really suffered in the last 10 years because of our focus on ct pics i guess i come up to your question answering that i'm cautiously optimistic that if we can keep things on the risk in which if you know what happened over the last two years, it's not an easy thing, it was like rolling down the side of her routine with rocks and cactus is and you don't know how far the routine goes. so goes. so what is a keeping things on track, it is not easy to get things on track, pakistan. because of the way it's mismanaged, because of the difficulties in our relationship. but if we're able to do so i think after 2014 there would be a prospect that we can open up the new kind of cooperation, if we are not slaves to a bilateral vision, based on mistrust
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2012 7:00am EST
online. today the u.s. economy accounts for 23% of the world's economy and india is 7. in 2030, according to the oecd predictions, china will be 29% of the world economy, the u.s. will be 18 and india will be 11. and those are, i think, really worthwhile numbers to keep in our mind as we talk about u.s. competitiveness in the world economy, because we're entering this entirely new era where the u.s. is going to be a big player in the world economy but no longer the preeminent, the very largest one, and i think that brings real challenges and requires a whole new way of thinking. so my opening remarks, steve was introduced, i think quite rightly, as a guy who i hope is getting cases of champagne and bouquets of flowers from the white house. because on certain readings you could say, you know, he's the guy who got the president reelected. that means, i believe, he has great insight into what obama's second term economic policy will be -- [laughter] and the big question on the agenda which i think certainly already tremendous bearing on u.s., on the u.s. domestic economy and, therefore, u.s.
CSPAN
Nov 20, 2012 6:00am EST
interests of countries like china and india in the middle east will increase and the role they will attempt to play is bound to increase because their supplies still become imported from at the same time, given the importance of the islamic world and what will accumulate in the region, continues to add interest in stability the new security team will have to do to make nontraditional assessment of heart they imagine the evolution -- and some of this will depend on the outcome of the election over the period of 10 to 15 years iran emerges as a country conducting normal publicity and will continue to be a country influenced with theological evolution. but that will be -- i expect china and india will become more active players in the region >> i will take the brunt of and ask one last question. we were talking earlier outside about a new country on the american foreign policy agenda, me and mar burma. president obama is going there. something is happening. is it important? how does it matter? >> burma is a country with a large population of potential resources, racked by a military government
CSPAN
Nov 13, 2012 8:00pm EST
's in negative territory, in the he's, china, india, and about the only things that the rest of the world likes about america are movie, tv, science, and technology. they are not keen on the democracy, as least as america preaches it. heading now into another four years of the obama administration where are we, and why are we here, and how do we get somewhere else? how do we live up to that promise? what went wrong? what's going right? what can we do about it going forward? >> simple. [laughter] well, fist of all, i don't think that favorability ratinging in the surveys are evidence of whether we are doing something wrong or right, and it's a huge mistake for anybody who practices public diplomacy to think that his or her job is to win a popularity contest. while i guess maybe some of us in the bush administration can take a certain pleasure at the fact that in 2008 the favorability ratings for the united states were higher and four out of the five surveyed arab countries, i'm not going to bring that up. [laughter] no, but i think it -- i think it's a big mistake, and, you know, in my view, and
CSPAN
Nov 5, 2012 11:00pm EST
and no one to fill them. then people complain when we have to find employees from places like india and abroad, and they complain that these companies send the problems. king: this is a problem. i sat down with the chamber of commerce and say ted we have 500 empty jobs in your county we can't fill because the people don't have the skills. high-tech manufacturing jobs. there's a disconnect between the educational system and the jobmark, and i think -- for example, just in terms of how complexity is, there's something like 55 different federal job training programs administered by nine different agencies. that's a recipe for both too much money, too much cost, and not enough coordination. so i think what we need to do is to have a closer link -- what told the folks, i'd like if i'm fortunate enough to be elected to put together a skills summit. not a job summit but a skills schmidt, so bring together the community colleges, technical schools, high schools, and university, with businesses to talk about what is actually needed so we can provide our people with the skills. to me it's hea
CSPAN
Nov 15, 2012 6:00am EST
, if the governors decide we're going to put all the money into india, it's their decision rather than the part of the more strategic decision-making process. congress would get involved if all the money went to one country. >> do you think? [laughter] >> there's certain country's bbg would like to get rid of that congress wouldn't allow and that sort of thing. but i'm guessing it really needs to be part of really part of the foreign policy apparatus. >> i want to open up to question. we have time for about 20 minutes. please keep them brief so we can get as many as possible. go ahead. >> first time i ever saw -- was 1967 in taipei at usia. it was in chinese. but now i work with two groups. one is dhi esper diplomats which serves the diplomatic community here in washington, and arranges events to show them what goes on you. also people to people international who post the foreign officers at the national defense university. was happen with this is weak, and we take these our homes and arrange events with them, then go back to the home countries and remember us. when diplomats wife went to thail
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2012 9:00am EST
communication technologies will tie together, and these are quotes, tied together indian in india, chicago and the congo. that speech, newt minow's insights, were inspirational to me when i first read them 20 years ago. and the fact is they helped inform today how the fcc thinks about new communication technologies. because the core messages from that speech are as relevant today as they were 50 years ago. the main difference of course is the primary new communication technology today is different. it's not broadcast tv or cable tv, satellite. it's broadband internet. so let's start with the opportunities around broadband. the benefits already being delivered by wired and wireless broadband are nothing short of extraordinary. we see here at home in the u.s. are it's no exaggeration to say that high speed internet is reshaping the u.s. economy. we can hardly imagine a world without google, facebook, twitter, amazon, wikipedia, without e-mail, texting, or the apple stores people are using to download 100 million apps a day. broadband is also transforming education, enabling distance learning
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2012 11:00pm EDT
china and i india, and the sooner we have substitute fuels, and i think for the intermediate future anyway, that's natural gas. as long as we're careful how it's extracted, and it can be extracted safely, can be enormous advantage to us. we can use it through natural gas -- i was on a bus today in portland powered by compressed natural gas. you can -- we can use it to power electric vehicles. at the same time, there needs to be a parallel track with renewables to be there when the gas runs out, the demand increases to the point where the price goes up. to power a vehicle on natural gas is equivalent to $2 a gallon, and it would be the same for home heating. getting off the oil should be the number one priority, and we're finally in a position to do it. this has just come to us in the last four or five years. >> moderator: all right. senator dill? dill: thank you. certainly, gas prices are a challenge to any family in maine trying to get their kids to school, get to the store, or get to work. i do support the president's fuel efficiency standards that will lead to automobiles that re
CSPAN
Nov 6, 2012 6:00am EST
to push all the money out into the economy that is in india, because everyone is afraid to stand. i'd just like to point out the great depression went on for more than 10 years after this rooseveltian seamers started but if you count the world war ii as a statement, which even barack obama's economic adviser, christina romer has refuted the idea that the war actually ended the depression, you know, none of that, the actual original failure of keynesian was during the depression and yet nobody saw that way. but if we're going to take that serious, take the idea that taking up slack in demand is what we need to do, how much do we need to spend? what is the dollar figure that government needs to put out? >> are you asking? >> yeah. >> there's a lot of debate about this. it's hard to come with a precise figure because we are human beings and we do the best -- >> the keynesians are the ones who believe that everything is trackable to these complex mathematical formulas with all kinds of greek letters and stuff. [inaudible] >> there was internal debate in the obama administration how big is the
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2012 9:00am EST
with some optimism but a relatively close election. but one thing to note is all the votes are not india, and i think by the time we report all vote in california, the west coast states that do a lot of absentee voting, the president's marginal grow a bit and i think we'll end up with a margin between obama and romney about 3.5%. so still close but not racist impose a not as close as we might've been talking about for a good deal of the election. i think of something right about all the model going on. i know a lot of people talked about that. i want to give a little shout out to many political scientist. i'm a political scientist. sometimes i'm critical of some of their models, but political models try to predict what happens in elections and they usually have some very simple components. how the president is doing. the growth in the economy. not the state of the economy. not the number of unemployment at how we've been improving over the are, and incumbents usually accounts or something. if you look at this election you can say a little bit of growth matters. a president who was sort o
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2012 12:00pm EST
was instrumental in opening up our opening of our relations with china and establishing new relations with india. he is in every sense the diplomat warrior what we most admire in our uniform, and our combat commander. i want to say thank you to bill, for you, for doing this, and let's turn this over to you. [applause] >> first big step. doctor, think you're much and welcome, ladies and gentlemen. while we are getting settled here, have our panelists come up and get settled into their chairs in order to serve. and for those of you that missed the chat line, it may be too late. [laughter] but then again, i don't think too many in israel are starting. not the same can be said for others in the world. i wanted to begin with first in case you missed the copies of this on the way in, recommended to your reading and perusal and safety john and steve, thanks for inviting me to participate here in this event. i never get into that in a minute what i think is really important. i'd also like to add my voice to the memory of trip to sell, who contributed as he did it so may things, to this effort just befor
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15